Can early intervention of CVI help slow the progression of the disease? I never had a vein issue until last year. I am a 52-year old female.

I started having heavy, achy legs not too long after my ankle sprain last year. I have been diagnosed (via ultrasound) as having CVI for 6 months now. Currently, I manage the pain with stockings, elevation, and exercise. Still, my quality of life suffers greatly. I have heard some horrible stories about being worse off after treatment. Will vein treatment completely help and cure CVI, or it is saved as last resort? Also, how do I ensure I'm not worse off after treatment?

Answers from doctors (5)


Cure can be obtained only by vein ablation, which is an office procedure.

Answered by University Vascular Associates (View Profile)

Cure can be obtained only by vein ablation, which is an office procedure.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Vein Specialties of St. Louis

Published on Jun 13, 2016

With your symptoms and their effect on your daily life, it is advisable to undergo laser vein ablation. If you seek consultation by a board-certified vascular-trained surgeon who specializes in this procedure, you should not have any problems. We have treated thousands safely with excellent outcomes. Left untreated, it may progress and there is an increased chance of clotting as the blood is not flowing correctly. Of course, at your evaluation, your surgeon will ensure you have a patent deep vein system.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/623_1499902138.jpg
Answered by Vein Specialties of St. Louis

With your symptoms and their effect on your daily life, it is advisable to undergo laser vein ablation. If you seek consultation by a board-certified vascular-trained surgeon who specializes in this procedure, you should not have any problems. We have treated thousands safely with excellent outcomes. Left untreated, it may progress and there is an increased chance of clotting as the blood is not flowing correctly. Of course, at your evaluation, your surgeon will ensure you have a patent deep vein system.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


The Sheen Vein Institute

Published on Jun 13, 2016

CVI is generally considered an inherited disorder. Therefore, you have really been developing your CVI since you were born. You only just started noticing the symptoms recently, which is not uncommon. Symptoms that develop over time are often viewed as age-related symptoms. Furthermore, since CVI develops over time, it generally takes a while for people to develop enough of it to actually start to compromise their venous circulation to generate symptoms. CVI contrary to what people think, is not cosmetic at all, it is in fact a venous circulatory defect. Any compromise in this venous system due to CVI will eventually give rise to symptoms. You are there. Fixing CVI will never cure you because of the inherited aspect of CVI. However, it will slow down its progression since CVI is a progressive disease. The more you have, the faster it develops. That said, treating CVI does not mean lasering or stripping or injecting one or two veins in the legs. In order to have symptoms, you must have quite a bit of abnormal veins. Proper treatment requires addressing the entire leg in order to repair the circulation. This is when your symptoms will resolve entirely. The problem is most "vein docs" only know how to fix part of the leg (usually 1-2 vessels). They fail to recognize the need to fix the entire leg from inside all the way out to the spider and reticular veins. Choose your doc wisely. Proper treatment for the average person requires months not days.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1116_1499984661.jpg
Answered by The Sheen Vein Institute

CVI is generally considered an inherited disorder. Therefore, you have really been developing your CVI since you were born. You only just started noticing the symptoms recently, which is not uncommon. Symptoms that develop over time are often viewed as age-related symptoms. Furthermore, since CVI develops over time, it generally takes a while for people to develop enough of it to actually start to compromise their venous circulation to generate symptoms. CVI contrary to what people think, is not cosmetic at all, it is in fact a venous circulatory defect. Any compromise in this venous system due to CVI will eventually give rise to symptoms. You are there. Fixing CVI will never cure you because of the inherited aspect of CVI. However, it will slow down its progression since CVI is a progressive disease. The more you have, the faster it develops. That said, treating CVI does not mean lasering or stripping or injecting one or two veins in the legs. In order to have symptoms, you must have quite a bit of abnormal veins. Proper treatment requires addressing the entire leg in order to repair the circulation. This is when your symptoms will resolve entirely. The problem is most "vein docs" only know how to fix part of the leg (usually 1-2 vessels). They fail to recognize the need to fix the entire leg from inside all the way out to the spider and reticular veins. Choose your doc wisely. Proper treatment for the average person requires months not days.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Hratch Karamanoukian, MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI , RPhS

Published on Jun 13, 2016

You are correct in that treating "CVI" will improve your symptoms and also be preventative.

According to the ACP guidelines, in places like the U.S., where technology exists to treat CVI with EVLT, VNUS, etc., these procedures should be performed in symptomatic venous insufficiency. They don't recommend the use of stockings as a prerequisite to getting these procedures. But in reality, most insurance companies still require patients to try stockings before they are treated.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/7742_1500327131.jpg
Answered by Hratch Karamanoukian, MD, FACS, RVT, RPVI , RPhS

You are correct in that treating "CVI" will improve your symptoms and also be preventative.

According to the ACP guidelines, in places like the U.S., where technology exists to treat CVI with EVLT, VNUS, etc., these procedures should be performed in symptomatic venous insufficiency. They don't recommend the use of stockings as a prerequisite to getting these procedures. But in reality, most insurance companies still require patients to try stockings before they are treated.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


General Vascular Surgery Group

Published on Apr 22, 2016

See a board-certified vein specialist with years of experience treating patients with CVI and other venous problems. In general, treatment will relieve your symptoms if your veins are the cause of them.

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/922_1408044082.jpg
Answered by General Vascular Surgery Group

See a board-certified vein specialist with years of experience treating patients with CVI and other venous problems. In general, treatment will relieve your symptoms if your veins are the cause of them.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Related Questions for Laser Vein Treatment

Laser Vein Treatment -3 answers
I had surgery on my great saphenous vein 2 years ago and still have pain and swelling around my ankle that goes up the leg about 3 inches. It hurts all the time. Could something have gone wrong with the procedure? The doctor used a needle he didn't like. Could this have caused my problem? I had the same procedure on my right leg and he was using needle he liked. I have no problems with this leg. Is there any other surgery or procedures that can help with the pain and swelling?
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -1 answer
I had ablation by laser for a large peripheral vein on the inside of my right leg 7 months ago. I recovered well after the procedure but have had issues in my foot since, such as pressure point type pain at various locations and currently on my big toe (only sore while walking). I had to stop wearing my orthopaedic insoles ages ago as the undersole of my foot got so tender from the pressure. Also in the past couple weeks I get a cold 'rushing' sensation in my toes while driving.
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -5 answers
I had laser surgery a month ago on both my legs. The procedure was done to resolve the leaking veins. My left leg is doing well, but I'm having trouble with my right. I have extreme pain behind the knee, especially when I bend it. Is this normal? What should I do?
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -6 answers
I have small scars up my whole leg and this pain is right where one of them is just inside my leg right above my knee. Should I be concerned? It's very tender to press on. They used a laser to cauterize different areas. Thanks for your help!
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -1 answer
I was told by the doctor I had a lot of blood at the top of my leg, almost like a hematoma. The morning after the procedure, I had a large bruise that spread from one side of my thigh to the inside of my leg, and it took weeks to recover. They said it was normal, but I had a lot of pain and still do years later. If this isn't nerve damage, what could it be?
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -2 answers
Seven weeks ago, I had a Candela Vbeam treatment on several patches of spider veins. I still have very visible purple blotches at each of the laser sites. I went into this thinking it was low risk, and now am very sad that I look quite a bit worse. Will they ever fade? Is there anything I can do to improve them? The procedure was performed by a dermatologist.
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -4 answers
I had laser surgery for my varicose veins almost a year ago and I still have a lump on my thigh that is swollen and painful. Is this normal? I have been to see my gp and he thinks there is no blood clot so not sure what else to do as it really bothers me and is not the best companion when I need to work with painful thigh.
See More
Get answers from our experienced doctors.
How it works
Laser Vein Treatment -1 answer
The patient has arterial fibrillation mitral valve disease. Patient had CMC DONE in 1989 and BMV done in 2006. Now the MV area is 0.89 sq cm2. The swelling is very tight and has pricking pain. What medicine is there to relieve the swelling? The patient wears compression stockings also. Please advise.
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -2 answers
My cardiologist said my veins were “refluxing” and if I didn’t have laser ablation the varicose veins could lead to a blood clot. When I started treatment I had no pain in my legs and only a few varicose veins. Now a year later I have a numb/tingling feeling, pain and atrophy in calf muscle; my legs require compression stockings constantly. Despite the above, she claims they look better!
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -5 answers
My procedure is scheduled for two weeks. Will I damage or complicate things having this done now. Is this too early?
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -2 answers
A few months after the procedure I started to get the terrible aching in my left calf. It gets so bad I can't stand it and nothing helps. I have talked to my doctor and they have done an ultrasound and found nothing, but it's been another month and it still is there. I am supposed to go back this week for another ultrasound but I'm very frustrated.
See More
Laser Vein Treatment -1 answer
In April of this year I had a laser vein treatment of my large saphenous vein on my left leg followed by several injections. The procedure went well and the majority of the vein discomfort is gone. However, around the front of my knee right where the shin bone meets the knee, is an area causing me a great deal of pain when I bend my knee. I went to the doctor yesterday and had an ultrasound on my knee and everything looked normal—just some dead veins still needing to absorb. Is this normal?
See More
Get answers from our experienced doctors.
How it works

Related Articles

Have specific questions?
ASK A DOCTOR